CD-ROM Installation

Installation and Users Guide

How do I start the CD-ROM?

Load the CD-ROM into your drive. Viewing the contents of the CD-ROM requires you to have a properly installed WWW browser, such as the Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer. A more detailed list of supported browsers is provided below. Open up the INDEX.HTM file on the CD-ROM with your browser, and then explore to your heart's content. The entire contents of the CD-ROM are accessible from this page.

How do I listen to the lectures?

If you haven't already, you'll need to install the Shockwave for Director plug-in. Currently, Shockwave is supported only on Windows and Macintosh platforms, but keep checking Macromedia's website at www.macromedia.com for updated information about other platforms. Make sure that after installing the plug-in you restart your browser, or the plug-in will not be recognized. Copies of these plug-ins have been included on the CD-ROM. Click here to select the plug-in appropriate for your system.

What hardware and software do I need for this plug-in?

For Windows: Any modern PC computer will do, but a Pentium is recommended because of its floating-point unit. Supported browsers include the Netscape Navigator 2.02 and 3.01, Internet Explorer 3.0 and 3.01 Final Releases, (note: Internet Explorer for Windows can use the Shockwave plugins or the Shockwave ActiveX control, which can be automatically installed at http://www.macromedia.com), Attachmate's Emissary, Netmanage's WebSurfer, and America Online version 3.0 (note: no plug-in installation should be necessary for the AOL browser for Windows.)

For Macintosh: Any PowerMac will do, but 68k Macs will require a hardware floating-point unit (math co-processor). Supported browsers include Netscape Navigator 2.02 and 3.01, Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 and 3.0a, Attachmate's Emissary, Netmanage's WebSurfer, and America Online version 3.0.

Commercial versions of Netscape Navigator 3.x and Microsoft Internet Explorer may come with the appropriate plug-ins already installed. If not, copies of these plug-ins have been included on the CD-ROM. Click here to select the plug-in appropriate for your system.

To use the CD-ROM under Unix

This CD-ROM is written as an ISO-9660 file system without Rock Ridge extensions. All filenames are written in upper case, and unless the file system is mounted correctly the HTML links will not be found. Unfortunately, different mount commands seem to be required for different flavors of Unix. Read your manual page and experiment. You must first create a mount point /cdrom. Let "sr0" be the SCSI ID for your CD-ROM drive (typically sr0 = "cdrom"). Possible mount commands which have worked on different systems include:

mount -rt hsfs /dev/sr0 /cdrom

mount -o norock,check=relaxed -r -t iso9660 /dev/sr0 /cdrom

Once the CD-ROM is mounted, open /cdrom/index.html with your favorite browser. The entire contents of the CD-ROM are accessible from this page. Unfortunately, the audio lecture notes are not supported on Unix platforms.

About the Images

Your browser likely has the option to automatically display or suppress in-line images. The mathematical symbols in the lecture notes and the textbook are represented by bit-mapped images, which might load slowly on certain systems. If so, disabling the automatic loading of images will result in better performance, although less readable text.

To enable/disable viewing of these images when using Netscape Navigator, choose "Options" from the menu bar, and select "Auto Load Images". To view images on one page only, or to load images which were not properly loaded, click the "Images" button on the graphical toolbar.

About the Sound

Sound files on this CD-ROM are recorded in Shockwave file format, and have the extension "SWA". Thus, the file "LEC19-2.SWA" contains sounds related to the second portion of lecture 19 in the lecture notes. Playing the audio requires a plug-in from Macromedia, which unfortunately is not available on Unix platforms.

Click here to select the plug-in appropriate for your system.

To listen to the sounds linked to the lecture notes you must:

About the Postscript Lecture Notes

All the Lecture Notes are provided in Postscript format as well. To view Postscript files on Unix, use ghostview.

Macintosh users: use the program DropPS 1.1.4, by Barebones Software.

Windows users: use the program RoPS 32